March 15 – The date of the assassination of Julius Caesar, which made the Ides of March a turning point in Roman history. Pessimists are comparing America to the fall of Rome. Do you believe we’ll end up with the same fate – falling like the Roman Empire did?

Caesar was stabbed to death at a meeting of the Senate. As many as 60 conspirators, led by Brutus and Cassius, were involved. According to Plutarch, a seer had warned that harm would come to Caesar on the Ides of March.

On his way to the Theatre of Pompey, where he would be assassinated, Caesar passed the seer and joked, “Well, the Ides of March are come”, implying that the prophecy had not been fulfilled, to which the seer replied “Aye, they are come, but they are not gone.”

This meeting is famously dramatised in William Shakespeare‘s play Julius Caesar, when Caesar is warned by the soothsayer to “beware the Ides of March.”