FOOD FROM CHINA… Smithfield Farms, the largest pork producing farm in the USA, was sold in September to China with the unanimous support of its stockholders! The hogs will still be raised here, but slaughtered and packaged for sale there before being sent back here. This includes labels of: 

·   Morrell 
·   Eckrich 
·   Krakus 
·   Cudahy 
·   Premium Hams 
·   Cook’s 
·   Gwaltney


Chickens 
The same applies to many chickens. They can now be shipped there, but when they come back all that needs to be labeled is that they ‘WERE RAISED IN THE USA’. Not that they were processed in China! 

Our great FDA at work again. The chickens will be all processed and most sold to fast food restaurants for sandwiches, along with schools and supermarkets. The China slaughter and processing are not nearly equal to the requirements here for cleanliness. 

*BAD FOOD* 

We recently learned that  Star-Kist Tuna is now owned by Korea , and is in big conflict with the U.S. concerning quality, safety and records, which Korea refuses produce. Read several articles on Google about this, and even one that was defending the eating of tilapia said to avoid the fish that came from China. 
Also   , I had just returned home from buying Albertson’s 4-day special of 4 bags of frozen tilapia for the price of one. Sure enough, on the top of the bags, it read “farm raised”, and on the bottom in small print it said, “China”. 

In general, farm raised fish should not be eaten because of the high concentration of antibiotics they are fed to prevent diseases due to being tightly confined with other fish. 
Buy wild caught fish from North America, Hawaii or New Zealand. Read all the way to the end. 

Recently a Food Inspector on TV said he had lived overseas and he had seen the filthy conditions their foods are raised and processed in. It is enough to make you throw up. Many of their fish on Fish Farms (the fish called SWAI) are fed raw sewage daily. He said he has seen so much filth throughout their food growing and processing that he would “never” eat any of it. They raise this filth, put some food coloring and some flavorings on it, then they ship it to the USA & Canada for YOU to consume and feed to YOUR families. They have no Food & Safety Inspectors. They ship it to you to buy and poison your families and friends. 

Imported food we eat and the junk we buy: 

Green Giant   frozen vegetables are from China and so are most of Europe’s Best. 

Arctic Gardens   are OK, so is   Birdseye . 

Never buy the grocery store   
garlic   unless it is clearly marked from USA or Canada , the other stuff is   grown in people poop   (even worse than chicken poop). China is the largest producer of garlic in the world; U.S. is next. 

Buy only local   honey , much honey is shipped in huge containers from China and re-packed here. 

Cold-FX   is grown and packed in China and is full of fecal bacteria.  Doesn’t work anyway, big scam 
If the country of origin is not clearly marked, beware! 

If produce, ask an employee. 

Watch out for packages which state “prepared for”, “packed by” or “imported by” . We don’t understand the lack of mandatory labeling, especially on the produce. 

The   country of origin  should be clearly shown on the item in the store. 

Go to the local farmers’ markets   in season and keep a wary eye open the rest of the year. 
How is it possible to ship food from China cheaper than having it produced in the U.S. or Canada? 

FOR EXAMPLE THE “OUR FAMILY” BRAND OF   MANDARIN ORANGES  SAYS RIGHT ON THE CAN ‘FROM CHINA ‘. SO, for a FEW MORE CENTS, BUY THE *LIBERTY* BRAND. 

GOLD BRAND or DOLE   is from CALIFORNIA. 

Beware,   Costco   sells   canned peaches and pears   in a plastic jar that come from China. 

ALL “HIGH LINER” AND MOST OTHER FROZEN FISH PRODUCTS COME FROM CHINA OR INDONESIA. THE PACKAGE MAY SAY “PACIFIC SALMON” ON THE FRONT, BUT LOOK FOR THE SMALL PRINT.   
MOST OF THESE PRODUCTS COME FROM FISH FARMS IN THE ORIENT WHERE THERE ARE NO REGULATIONS ON WHAT IS FED TO THESE FISH. 

Recently The Montreal Gazette had an article by the Canadian Government on how Chinese feed the fish: They suspend chicken wire crates over the fish ponds, and the fish feed on chicken poop. If you search the internet about what the Chinese feed their fish, you’ll be alarmed e.g., growth hormones, expired antibiotics from humans? 

Never buy any type of fish or shellfish that comes from these countries: 
•• Vietnam 
•• China 
•• Philippines 
Steinfeld’s Pickles   are made in India – just as bad! 

Another example is in   canned mushrooms . No-Name brand came from Indonesia. 
Also check those   little fruit cups . They used to be made in Canada in the Niagara region until about 2 years ago. They are now packaged in China. Most sold in Aldi stores. 

While the Chinese export inferior and even toxic products, dangerous toys and goods to be sold in North American markets, the media wrings its hands!   
Yet, at least 70% of North Americans believe that the trading privileges afforded to the Chinese should be suspended. Well, duh! Why do you need the government to suspend trading privileges? SIMPLY DO IT YOURSELF, CANADA and the UNITED STATES. 

Simply look on the bottom of every product you buy, and if it says ‘Made in China’ or ‘PRC’ (and that now includes Hong Kong),   simply choose another product or none at all. You will be amazed at how dependent you are on Chinese products, and you will be equally amazed at what you can do without. 

THINK ABOUT THIS: 

If 200 million North Americans refuse to buy just $20 each of Chinese goods, that’s a billion dollar trade imbalance resolved in our favor… fast! The downside? Some Canadian/American businesses will feel a temporary pinch from having foreign stockpiles of inventory. 

Just one month of trading losses will hit the Chinese for 8% of their North American exports. Then they will at least have to ask themselves if the benefits of their arrogance and lawlessness are worth it. 

Send this to everybody you know. Let’s show them that we are intelligent and NOBODY can take us for granted.

____________________ 

Larry DeVille, FL

ALSO…

DEFECTIVE DRYWALL /SHEETROCK FROM CHINA CAUSE BILLIONS IN DAMAGES FOR US HOME BUYERS! 

Posted on: Oct 08, 2009   •   Category:   Home BuildersHome BuyingLuxury Homes

https://www.har.com/blog_2358_defective-drywall-_sheetrock-from-china-cause-billions-in-damages-for-us-home-buyers

Thousands of U.S. Homeowners Cite Drywall for Ills

When Bill Morgan, a retired policeman, moved into his newly built dream home in Williamsburg, Va., three years ago, his hopes were quickly dashed.

His wife and daughter suffered constant nosebleeds and headaches. A persistent foul odor filled the house. Every piece of metal indoors corroded or turned black.

In short order, Mr. Morgan moved out. The headaches and nosebleeds stopped, but the ensuing financial problems pushed him into personal bankruptcy.

“My house is not worth the land it’s built on,” said Mr. Morgan, who could not maintain the mortgage payments on his $383,000 home in a Williamsburg subdivision called Wellington Estates and the costs of a rental property where his family decamped.

Mr. Morgan, like many other American homebuyers who tell similar tales of woe, is blaming the drywall in his new home — specifically, drywall from China, imported during the housing boom to meet heavy demand — that he says is contaminated with various sulfur compounds.

Hundreds of lawsuits are piling up in state and federal courts, and a consolidated class action is moving forward in Louisiana before Judge Eldon E. Fallon of Federal District Court, who will begin hearing cases in January.

Three hundred cases have been filed in Louisiana alone, many with similar complaints from homeowners — a noxious smell, recurrent headaches and difficulty breathing. In Florida, the health department has received over 500 complaints with such symptoms.

In addition, these suits say, metal objects in homes corrode quickly, causing kitchen appliances, air-conditioners, televisions and plumbing to fail.

“There could be 60,000 to 100,000 homes that are worthless and have to be ripped completely down and rebuilt,” said Arnold Levin, a Philadelphia lawyer and co-chairman of the plaintiffs’ steering committee.

While tainted Chinese imports like toothpaste, pet food and baby formula have been quickly removed from store shelves, drywall is installed throughout homes and does not lend itself to a quick fix.

This month, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, whose investigation into Chinese drywall is the largest in its history, will release the results of a study to determine why the drywall is causing the problem, and what kind of remediation programs might be effective.

Already, the commission has sent six investigators to Chinese gypsum mines and to meet with the government there. The Chinese government’s counterpart to the federal safety commission sent two of its experts here to inspect affected homes.

The commission is also making sure that no more Chinese drywall comes into the country.

“Our ports are on alert,” said Inez Tenenbaum, chairwoman of the commission. “They are not letting any in. The market, too, has corrected. No one wants Chinese drywall.”

Even President Obama is being pressed by members of Congress to raise the issue on his November trip to China — the loudest cry coming from Senator Bill Nelson, Democrat of Florida, who has traveled to China on his own to learn more about the drywall problems.

Investigators are finding that getting scientific data, establishing legal accountability and following a supply chain is difficult when so many drywall sheets — millions in all were brought into the United States — were simply marked “Made in China,” providing no clues to their actual source. The drywall was brought in because United States supplies ran low, not as a cost-saving measure for builders.

One target of the lawsuits is Knauf Plasterboard Tianjin, a German company with manufacturing plants in China that supplied about 20 percent of the Chinese drywall brought into the United States.

Don Hayden, the company’s lawyer, said that its own toxicology tests from affected homes showed that the drywall presented no health problems. Even so, he said his company was cooperating with American government investigations.

“Unlike other Chinese manufacturers, we are the only one to come to the United States to address this problem,” said Mr. Hayden. “We’ve spent considerable time and energy and hope that we can provide a workable solution to U. S. homeowners.”

One puzzle is why problems have surfaced in the United States and not Asia, where drywall was also sold. According to a safety commission official who declined to be named because of the delicacy of the issue, a theory offered by Chinese officials during their visit to the United States was that American homes are more tightly built, with less ventilation than homes in China.

One drywall manufacturer, the Tishan Gypsum Company, which is controlled by the Chinese government, was found to be in preliminary default last week by a federal judge after the company failed to show up in court.

But whether the Florida builders who brought the class-action lawsuit could ever collect on any future judgment remains unclear, because of the difficulty of gaining jurisdiction and enforcing rulings against foreign companies, especially in China. In other cases, many of the Chinese companies cannot be found or have disbanded.

Homeowners, insurers, home builders, drywall suppliers and Chinese manufacturers, if they can be identified, are often suing each other. Drywall installers and suppliers are also expected to be targets of the next wave of litigation. Many lawsuits need to be translated into Mandarin and follow rules of international law, adding layers of difficulty.

Among the homeowners filing suit are the lieutenant governor of Florida, Jeff Kottkamp; and Sean Peyton, head coach of the New Orleans Saints, who has moved out of his Mandeville, La., home.

The product safety commission has received more than 1,300 complaints from 26 states, but the bulk are from Florida, Louisiana and Virginia, where hurricanes  led to an unprecedented housing boom in 2006 and 2007.

In 2006 alone, nearly seven million sheets of drywall were imported from China. The federal court in the Eastern District of Louisiana has identified 26 brands of drywall, but 11 others had no markings other than variations of “Made in China.”

Insurance companies, in particular, have become a popular target of lawsuits over their refusal to pay claims filed by homeowners and home builders, stating that their policies do not cover problems caused by pollutants.

There are estimates that it costs $100,000 to $150,000 per home to rip out and replace tainted drywall and the electrical equipment attached to it. In these cases, homes are being stripped down to the studs and new drywall is installed.

Some home builders, worried about their reputations, are doing just that. The Lennar Corporation has set aside $40 million for home repairs, while it tries to collect from its insurance company and sues several Chinese suppliers and American middlemen. Lennar declined to comment.

But many smaller home builders, hoping to survive the downturn, do not have such deep pockets. “This couldn’t have come at a worse time for the industry,” said Jenna Hamilton, assistant vice president of government affairs at the National Association of Home Builders.

For that reason, some members of Congress hope the federal government will provide financial assistance for their constituents, just as it does after natural disasters.

There may be local relief, too. Broward County, Fla., has cut property assessments as much as 20 percent in some affected areas and Miami-Dade is considering a similar tax break. “Florida is hypersensitive to hurricanes and this is like a silent hurricane,” said Representative Robert Wexler, Democrat of Florida. “Whole neighborhoods are being wiped out in terms of property values and people’s ability to remain in their homes.”

Help could not come soon enough for Mr. Morgan’s Virginia dream home.

“Every piece of drywall in the house except for four pieces is Chinese,” said Mr. Morgan. ”We built our home to be safe from floods, and for three years we’ve been breathing this stuff.”

Mr. Morgan said that metal fixtures in his house turned black. His air-conditioner and electrical outlets failed. Lamps and mirrors tarnished immediately. Neighbors, too, had similar problems..

Mr. Morgan bought his house in 2006 after his family spent two years living in a trailer provided by the Federal Emergency Management Agency when their previous home was destroyed in 2003 by Hurricane Isabel. Mr. Morgan has lost the equity in his home, but he still drops by to cut the grass.

“When I drive by my house, it breaks my heart,” he said.

By LESLIE WAYNE
The New York Times