Have you noticed?

Grocery Store Prices Up 10.8%, Most in Nearly 42 Years as Americans Face Higher Prices on Hamburger Meat, Baby Food, Chicken, Bacon, Soup, and Coffee

  • Importantly, these prices are seasonally adjusted so they cannot be explained by typical the end of holiday shopping season sales.
  • Here are some of the most striking moves in food prices:

  • Ground beef: up 14.8 percent.
  • Steaks: up 11.8 percent.
  • Bacon: up 17.7 percent.
  • Pork Chops: up 14.0 percent.
  • Chicken: up 16.4 percent.
  • Fresh Fish: up 13.0 percent
  • Fresh whole milk: up 14.7 percent.
  • Coffee: up 13.5 percent.
  • Fresh fruit: up 8.3 percent.
  • Lettuce: up 12.7 percent.
  • Salad Dressing: up 13.1 percent.
  • Soups: up 13.1 percent.
  • Baby food: up 13 percent.
  • Breakfast cereal: up 12.1 percent.
  • Bread: up 9.1 percent.
  • Biscuits and muffins: up 10.1 percent.
  • Lunchmeats: up 14.4 percent.
  • Eating out is not really a better option. Fast food prices are up seven percent and full-service restaurant prices are up 87 percent. Even vending machine prices are up 7.1 percent.

Source: breibart.com

Why is biggest baby formula plant in US STILL shut down after three months? Abbott says plant is safe and was not responsible for bacteria that killed two kids – but FDA refuses to reopen it as parents across US struggle to feed their babies

  • Abbott Laboratories claims its Michigan plant is not responsible for bacteria that killed at least two infants
  • The baby formula manufacturer alleged an FDA investigation revealed ‘infant formula produced at our Sturgis facility is not the likely source of infection’
  • Abbott claims products from the facility did not cause any bacterial outbreak 
  • The plant still remains closed despite the findings after shutting down in February amid a major product recall 
  • Abbott says it’s ‘working closely with the FDA to restart operations’ at the plant as parents across the nation are struggling to get formula for their babies 
  • Texas, Tennessee, Missouri, Iowa, North Dakota and South Dakota, seemingly hardest hit by the shortages, reported out-of-stock rates of about 50 percent