FLASHBACK: CIA Sabotaged Soviet Pipeline to Europe in 1982 – US Software Caused Massive Explosion in Siberian Pipeline Seen From Space

From The Gateway Pundit

CIA Sabotaged Soviet Pipeline to Europe in 1982 – US Software Caused Massive Explosion in Siberian Pipeline Seen From Space

Aerial view of blown Nord Stream pipeline near Bornholm Island. Three deep-water explosions destroyed the Nord Stream pipelines under the Baltic Sea last week on Monday. Swedish seismologists reported that one of the three explosions measures 2.3 on the Richter Scale of earthquake intensity, but this was no earthquake. It was explosion—like a gigantic undersea mine.

The explosions guarantee Germany and the EU won’t go wobbly with regard to sanctions against Russian energy imports. The damage to pipelines will take months repair, and repairs are unlikely to begin until next summer. Even if Germany were to cry “uncle” as civil unrest intensifies over lack of heat and energy, even if Russia decided to turn the power back on, the conduit for Russian gas to Europe is broken.

No country has yet taken responsibility for the blasts that took out the Nord Stream pipelines to Europe. Only one country benefits. We wrote aobut this extensively at The Gateway Pundit last week.

This was originally posted at the Washington Post on February 27, 2004.
By David Hoffman

In January 1982, President Ronald Reagan approved a CIA plan to sabotage the economy of the Soviet Union through covert transfers of technology that contained hidden malfunctions, including software that later triggered a huge explosion in a Siberian natural gas pipeline, according to a memoir by a Reagan White House official.

Thomas C. Reed, a former Air Force secretary who was serving in the National Security Council at the time, describes the episode in “At the Abyss: An Insider’s History of the Cold War,” published by Ballantine Books. Reed writes that the pipeline explosion was just one example of “cold-eyed economic warfare” against the Soviet Union that the CIA carried out under Director William J. Casey during the final years of the Cold War.

At the time, the United States was attempting to block Western Europe from importing Soviet natural gas. There were also signs that the Soviets were trying to steal a wide variety of Western technology.

“In order to disrupt the Soviet gas supply, its hard currency earnings from the West, and the internal Russian economy, the pipeline software that was to run the pumps, turbines, and valves was programmed to go haywire, after a decent interval, to reset pump speeds and valve settings to produce pressures far beyond those acceptable to pipeline joints and welds,” Reed writes.

“The result was the most monumental non-nuclear explosion and fire ever seen from space,” he recalls, adding that U.S. satellites picked up the explosion. Reed said in an interview that the blast occurred in the summer of 1982.

There are even photos online of the explosion site in Siberia.